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Distracted-Driving-300x200

Distracted Driving is defined as doing anything that diverts a driver’s attention away from driving their vehicle. There are four types of Driver Distraction. They are as follows:

  1. Visual – Not looking at the road.
  2. Auditory – Hearing something that is not related to driving a motor vehicle.

Cell-Phone-Distracted-Driving-Ticket-300x226Illinois does not allow motorists to use their cell phone for talking, texting, or using any other means of electronic communication while they are operating their motor vehicle on a public road. The only way you can use your cell phone while driving is through Bluetooth technology, provided that you are 19 and over. In the last couple of years, tickets issued for using cell phones while driving have become common. The laws regarding use of a cell phone while driving have undergone several changes throughout the years. As a result, many motorists are not fully aware of what the rules are when it comes to using their cell phones while driving. Most of the clients who I meet for cases like this frequently tell me that they did not know how restrictive the cell phone usage laws are in Illinois. I want to take this opportunity to explain the cell phone Distracted Driving law in Illinois so that you know what is allowed and what is not allowed in Illinois.

In 2019, the Illinois legislature changed the Illinois Distracted Driving law by imposing stricter limits on the use of cell phones in cars, and making a ticket for using your cell phone while driving a moving violation in Illinois. Before 2019, a ticket for using your cell phone in your car was punishable by a fine only and was not reported to the Illinois Secretary of State so a ticket for using your cell phone would not affect your license. After 2019, a ticket for using your cell phone while driving is considered a moving violation which will be reported to the Secretary of State and will go on your driving record and affect the status of your driver’s license. A ticket for using your cell phone will never be removed from your driving record, regardless of what happens with the ticket.

What Is Not Allowed

Aggravated-or-Excessive-Speeding-300x127Lately, many of the phone calls I receive start off with clients telling me that they received a “speeding ticket” and asking whether they can really go to jail for their “speeding ticket.” I ask them how fast they were going, and if they were going 26 miles per hour, or more, over the posted speed limit, I have to explain what they are facing. I start off by explaining that what they received is not a speeding ticket. At least it’s not what most people commonly considered to be a speeding ticket. It’s called Aggravated Speeding in llinois. Speeding 26-miles per hour over the posted speed limit is a crime in Illinois. It’s called Aggravated Speeding and can be found at If you did not know this, don’t feel bad. Most people do not realize that speeding 26-miles per hour over the posted speed limit is a crime in Illinois until it happens to them. Sometimes, lawyers don’t even know that driving 26-miles per hour over the posted speed limit is a crime in Illinois (more on that later.) Illinois has made speeding 26-miles per hour over the posted speed limit a crime that carries potential serious consequences. Just like any other crime in Illinois, driving 26-miles per hour over the posted speed limit carries a potential jail sentence that all Illinois driver’s should be aware of. Let me explain.

Cases involving drivers caught driving 26-miles per hour over the posted speed limit are commonly called Aggravated or Excessive Speeding cases. Under 625 ILCS 5/11-601.5(a), if you are caught driving between 26 to 34 miles per hour over the posted speed limit, you can be charged with a Class B Misdemeanor. A Class B Misdemeanor carries up to 180 days in county jail and a maximum fine of $1,500. Under 625 ILCS 5/601.5(b), if you are caught driving 35-miles per hour, or more, over the posted speed limit, you can be charged with a Class A Misdemeanor. A Class A Misdemeanor carries up to 1 year in county jail and a maximum fine of $2,500.

Just like any other criminal offense, you will need to have a lawyer represent you if you receive an Aggravated or Excessive Speeding charge. Believe it or not, there’s lawyers out there that do not realize that driving 26-miles per hour over the posted speed limit is a crime until they go to Court and find out that what their client is facing is not a simple speeding ticket. Unless the lawyer commonly handles Aggravated or Excessive speeding cases, they will not know what to do when they get to Court. A few weeks ago I was at a local courthouse waiting to talk to the prosecutor about my client’s Aggravated Speeding charge when I started talking to the lawyer who was in front of me in line. I had never seen this lawyer before in Court. The lawyer told me that she was taking care of the speeding ticket for a family friend and as I was talking to her about the case, she told me that her client was going 42-miles per hour over the posted speed limit and asked me if she could just get Court Supervision for her client for the speeding ticket. I realized that the attorney did not understand that her client was being charged with a Class A Misdemeanor that carried a possible criminal conviction and a potential jail sentence of up to 1-year and a maximum fine of $2,500. I had explain all of this to the lawyer and she got a continuance for her client and sent the client to me to represent her for the Class A Excessive Speeding Charge. I was able to get the prosecutor to drop the charge down to a petty offense after the client performed some community service hours. The client had to pay a small fine and the court costs, and take a Driver Improvement Course.

Distracted-Driving-300x200

As of July 1, 2019, Illinois has become a “Hands-Free Zone”. In 2010, texting and driving was outlawed in Illinois.  In 2014, using your cell phone without a hands-free device was outlawed. But apparently, that was not enough. In 2018 the Illinois Legislature enacted a new Distracted Driving law that substantially increases the penalties for using a cell phone while operating a vehicle on Illinois roads which could lead to the suspension of your Illinois driver’s license.

Distracted Driving is a broad definition which covers more than just the use of a cell phone or an electronic device in your vehicle. You can be cited for Distracted Driving for applying makeup while driving, or looking at a printed map while driving your vehicle. However, the overwhelming majority of Distracted Driving tickets involve the use of a cell phone while driving.

The Old Law

Yield-to-an-Emergency-Vehicle-300x200Recently, I was hired to represent several clients who were charged with Failure to Yield to an Emergency Vehicle. During the course of representing these clients, I realized that many Illinois motorists do not fully understand the law when it comes to passing a stationary emergency vehicle that is stopped on the side of the road. I want to take this opportunity to discuss this law and what it involves. If you do not understand the law, and what it requires when you are passing an emergency vehicle that is stopped on the side of the road, you could find yourself with a very serious traffic ticket that could cause you to lose your license and cost you a lot of money.

What Is The Law and Why is it So Serious?

The Failure to Yield to an Emergency Vehicle statute was enacted by the Illinois Legislature after the September 2000 death of Lieutenant Scott Gillen of the Chicago Fire Department after an intoxicated motorist sped through an accident scene and pinned him against a fire truck. In response, the Illinois Legislature passed “Scott’s Law” to protect police and fire officials who are performing their responsibilities on the side of the road. Tickets involving the Failure to Yield to an Emergency Vehicle are commonly referred to as “Scott’s Law” by police, judges, and lawyers.

Excessive-Speeding-300x200Early this morning I received a phone call from a prospective client who wanted to talk to me about a “speeding ticket” they received last night for going 30 miles per hour over the posted speeding ticket on a local highway. I receive such phone calls from prospective clients almost every day. Very few people calling me for cases like this really understand what they are facing. I have written about cases like this because I handle many cases involving Aggravated or Excessive speeding. These phone calls usually start off with the prospective client wanting to talk about a “speeding ticket” they recently received. Once I find out that the “speeding ticket” is for 26 miles per hour, or more, over the posted speed limit, I usually have to explain to the prospective clients that what they are facing is not a simple speeding ticket. If you are cited for going 26 miles an hour, or more, over the posted speed limit, what you are facing is an actual criminal charge of Aggravated or Excessive Speding. Going 26 miles or more, over the posted speed limit is an actual crime in Illinois that carries a potential jail sentence. Let me explain.

If you are cited for going 26 to 34 miles per hour over the posted speed limit, you will be charged with a Class B Misdemeanor. A Class B Misdemeanor carries up to 6-months in County Jail and a maximum fine of $1,500. If you are cited for going 35 miles per hour, or more, over the posted speed limit, you will be facing a Class A Misdemeanor. A Class A Misdemeanor carries a maximum fine of $2,500 and up to one-year in County Jail. In addition to the serious criminal criminal penalties associated with these crimes, if you are convicted of a Class A or a Class B Misdemeanor for Excessive Speeding, you will have a criminal conviction on your criminal record that will appear on a routine background search. So, if you apply for a job and are asked whether you have ever been convicted of a crime, you will have to answer “yes”.

Another question I get from prospective clients who call me about cases like this is whether I think they need a lawyer. Because what they are facing is not a simple speed ticket and is an actual crime, when they go to Court they will find out that they will need a lawyer. Many times, the first question asked by the Judge in cases like this is whether you have a lawyer. If you respond by telling the Judge that you don’t have a lawyer, the Judge will tell you that because what you are facing is a crime, you must have a lawyer. The next question will be whether you can afford to hire your own lawyer. If the Judge determines that you are unable to afford your own lawyer, the Judge may appoint a Public Defender to represent you. However, if the Judge determines that you are working and can afford to hire your own lawyer, the Judge will continue your case and tell you to come back to Court with your own lawyer.

Excessive-Speeding-300x199I frequently receive phone calls from clients who have received a speeding ticket for driving at a high rate of speed. While speaking with these clients, it is not uncommon for me to find out that they were driving at such a high rate of speed that I need to explain to them that what they are charged with is not your typical, run-of-the-mill, speeding ticket. I end up having to explain to them that what they are facing is a criminal charge known as Aggravated or Excessive Speeding that carries a possible jail sentence in County Jail. Let me explain how an Aggravated or Excessive Speeding ticket in Illinois can land you in jail and lead to a criminal conviction that will appear on your record in a routine background search.

Most speeding tickets are considered a petty offense. The typical speeding ticket carries a fine only. This means that you cannot go to jail for your typical speeding ticket. Basically, Illinois Law provides that you cannot drive at a speed that is “greater than is reasonable and proper with regards to traffic conditions and the use of the highway, or endangers the safety of any person or property.” This basically means that you must drive at a safe speed. What is considered a safe speed depends on the conditions at the time. In other words, what is considered a safe speed may vary depending on the time of day and the weather conditions. However, if you are caught driving above the absolute speed limit, you may receive a ticket for speeding regardless of the time of day and conditions. If the speed limit is 55 and you are driving faster than the speed limit, you may receive a ticket regardless of the weather conditions or the time of day. The defense that you were driving with “the flow of traffic” will not work in Court. If the speed limit is 55 and you are driving 55 miles an hour in a blizzard while all the other cars on the roadway are driving at 30 miles an hour, you may receive a ticket for speeding even though you did not exceed the posted speed limit. As you can tell, being found guilty of speeding above the posted speed limit is much easier for the prosecutor to prove in court than it is for them to prove that you were driving greater than what was reasonable and proper with regard to traffic conditions and the use of the highway.

The absolute speed limit is posted on signs.  In general, the absolute speed limits on Illinois roads are as follows, unless posted otherwise:

Speeding-Ticket-300x226In the past few years, the Illinois Legislature has enacted laws which make Excessive Speeding a much more serious matter than most people think. Most people are conditioned to believe that if they are pulled over for speeding they will receive a simple speeding ticket and the most that could happen to them is that they have to pay a steep fine and take a Traffic School class. The recent changes to the speeding laws have made certain Excessive Speeding tickets an actual crime. From all of the calls that I get from prospective clients, this area of the criminal law may be one of the most misunderstood subjects.

If you are caught speeding 26 to 34 miles per hour over the posted speed limit, you will be charged with a Class B Misdemeanor. A Class B Misdemeanor for speeding 26 to 34 miles per hour over the posted speed limit carries a maximum punishment of 180 days in County Jail and a maximum fine of up to $1,500. If you are caught speeding 35 miles per hour, or over, the posted speed limit, you will be charged with a Class A Misdemeanor. A Class A Misdemeanor for speeding 35 miles per hour over the posted speed limit carries a maximum punishment of up to one year in County Jail and a maximum fine of up to $2,500. So, if you are pulled over for speeding 26 miles per hour, and over, the posted speed limit, you will not receive a simple speeding ticket. You will be arrested and charged with a crime which carries a potential jail sentence. In addition to any possible criminal penalties, a conviction for speeding 26 miles per hour over the posted speed limit may result in the suspension of your driver’s license by the Illinois Secretary of State. A conviction for Excessive Speeding will remain permanently on your driving record with the Secretary and will appear as a criminal conviction in a routine background search. Not only will a prospective employer find out that you have been convicted of a crime, but your insurance company may use this conviction to drop you from their Auto Insurance plan or increase your insurance premiums.

Yesterday, the Illinois Department of Transportation greeted local motorists with some good news which may help reduce the number of Excessive Speeding cases that could lead to a criminal conviction and a potential jail sentence. Up until now, the speed limit on I-90 west of Elgin was 70 miles per hour all the way to Wisconsin. Yesterday, the Illinois Department of Transportation announced that the speed limit from Randall Road in Elgin to Mount Prospect Road has been increased to 70 miles per hour for all passenger cars. The new speed limit matches the 70 mile per hour speed limit from Elgin to Wisconsin. The previous speed limit from Randall Road in Elgin to Mount Prospect Road was 55 miles per hour.

Speeding-Ticket-LawyerIn the past several weeks, I have spoken to several clients who were arrested for Aggravated or Excessive Speeding and were charged with a crime. Most of the people I spoke to did not realize that they could be arrested for speeding. Many people do not understand the Illinois speeding laws and how a simple speeding ticket can lead to you being arrested and facing the real possibility of having a criminal conviction appear on your record and a possible jail sentence in your future. I want to take this opportunity to try to help people understand just how drastic the consequences of a speeding ticket in Illinois can be.

In general, if you are pulled over for speeding over the posted speed limit, you will not be arrested. The police officer will issue you a speeding ticket and depending on the County that you were pulled over in, and your driving record, you may be given the opportunity to avoid going to Court by paying a fine or by attending Traffic Safety School. But in certain circumstances, being pulled over by a police officer for speeding could result in an arrest and criminal charges.

Aggravated or Excessive Speeding

Speeding-Ticket-Lawyer-300x200Recently, I have represented clients who received speeding tickets. In the course of representing these clients, I have come to realize that people do not really understand the Illinois Speeding Laws. In the last few years, the Illinois speeding laws have been changed. The changes have drastically increased the penalties for excessive speeding on Illinois roadways. Drivers are not adequately informed of what the potential consequences can be for a speeding ticket.

As someone who has received speeding tickets in the past, I remember when the biggest inconvenience associated with receiving a speeding ticket was having to take time off of work or school to go to Traffic Court at 321 North LaSalle, pay to park my car downtown, and wait for my case to be called and be dismissed because the police officer did not appear. Hundreds of thousands of Chicagoans used to visit that building every year.  Those days have changed. What used to be a major inconvenience can now lead to a potential jail sentence and a suspension of your driver’s license. Let me explain how the Illinois Legislature has made speeding a potential crime and not just a mere inconvenience.

There have been some positive changes for Chicago residents.  For one thing, Traffic Court has now been moved into the lower levels of the Daley Center.  This makes it easier to get to traffic court.  The CTA train stops at the Daley Center so you don’t have to drive to Traffic Court and navigate your way through the heavy Loop traffic only to pay the high fees to park your car at a parking lot in the loop.  Traffic tickets are still being dismissed when police officers do not appear in Traffic Court but police officers are appearing in Traffic Court more often because Police Department policies have changed to require that police officers appear in Court.